gluten-free casein-free (GFCF)

definition of gluten-free casein-free (GFCF): diet that is both gluten free (GF) and casein free (CF). People following this diet do not eat gluten (found in wheat and other grains) or casein (found in milk and milk products). While there are many products (processed foods) that can be bought to meet the needs of a GFCF diet, the diet can also be accomplished by eating simply prepared protein (eggs, nuts, meat, etc), vegetables (including starchy vegetables such as potatoes) and fruit.

Pediatric Nutritionist

Physician Cautions Against Restrictive Diets for Autism Unless Necessary

Teaser: 

Dr. Jay L. Hoecker suggests that parents of children with autism should be careful when starting their child on a new diet.

Body: 

Dr. Jay L. Hoecker, an emeritus consultant in Mayo Clinic’s Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, suggests that parents of children with autism should be careful when starting their child on a new diet. He explains that restrictive diets, such as the gluten-free, casein-free diet may be harmful if basic nutritional needs are not met. He suggests that before putting your child on a special diet, you should seek the expertise of a nutritionist or doctor. Hoecker reminds parents, for example, that Temple Grandin’s mother did not have her on a GFCF diet, “neither did the majority of parents of the greatest known dults with autism who are now fully functional in our society.” He believes that early intervention is probably the best starting point to helping kids with autism.

Treatment of Food Selectivity in a Young Child with Autism

Therapeutic feeding intervention may increase the number and variety of foods eaten by a child with autism.

Wood BK, Wolery M, Kaiser AP.  2009.  Treatment of Food Selectivity in a Young Child with Autism. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities. 24(3):169-177.

Food Allergy and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Is There a Link?

Probiotics may help to relieve gut problems in children with autism.

Jyonouchi H.  2009.  Food Allergy and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Is There a Link? Current Allergy and Asthma Reports. 9(3):194-201.
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