sensory integration

definition of sensory integration: Neurological process that organizes sensation from one's own body and the environment. Sensory integration makes it possible to use the body effectively within the environment. Children with autism are believed to have difficulties integrating sensory information. One program, the Bolles Sensory Learning Program, uses stimulation of visual (visual integration training), auditory, and vestibular (balance) senses to help improve sensory issues.

Colorado Springs is Home to PlayDate Behavioral Interventions

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PlayDate Behavioral Interventions provides ABA, respite, and educational placement for kids with autism and their families.

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PlayDate Behavioral Interventions provides ABA, respite, and educational placement for kids with autism and their families. PlayDate founder, Christina Nulk, notice a gap in Colorado Springs' services; there were more kids with special needs requiring intervention and therapy than there were facilities to provide them. PlayDate therapists provide in-home therapy, in-school therapy, and therapy at their 5,000 square foot facility, which contains a sensory gym and a kitchen for life skills training. In addition, PlayDate offers much of its care for free. Nulk explained, “There is an unmet need for behavioral therapy in a fun environment and we are working hard to ensure that every child that needs it has the opportunity for this kind of service.”

Minnesota Airport Hosts Adjustment Events for Families with Autism

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The Twin Cities Airport and the Autism Society of Minnesota (AuSM) have a program families with autism to familiarize the kids with travel.

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The Twin Cities Airport and the Autism Society of Minnesota (AuSM) are presenting a program for families with autism to familiarize the kids and airport staff to travelling with autism. Navigating Autism occurs one Saturday each month when children and their families are shown the entire airplane boarding process. The focus is to prepare the children for potential sensory overload, lots of people, and loud noise. While practice doesn’t cover plane delays, parents are encouraged to have books, iPads, or other things their children like to do on hand.

Orlando Arts Community Provides Creative Outlets for Children with Autism

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Orlando Ballet, Orlando Museum of Art, and Orlando Repertory Theatre are conducting programs for kids with autism.

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Orlando Ballet, Orlando Museum of Art (OMA), and Orlando Repertory Theatre are conducting programs specifically for kids with autism and other special needs. The Ballet is introducing an adaptive dance class, OMA is offering Creative Connections, and the Repertory theatre is offering sensory-friendly live performances. Dr. Emily Forrest explained, “We know that a lot of kids respond well to art, music and movement.” The kids are able to learn new creative outlets such as movement, color, and literature. Parents are able to participate in arts events with their children and socialize with other families.

Louisville Movie Theater Provides Weekly Sensory-Friendly Film for Kids with Autism

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Sensory Sensitive Cinema is an offshoot of the nation-wide RaveCinemas company.

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Sensory Sensitive Cinema is an offshoot of the nation-wide RaveCinemas company. This particular article focused on sensory friendly films in Louisville KY. Every Saturday morning, the RaveCinemas theatre on Hurstbourne Parkway will show a movie especially set up for kids with autism or those with sensory issues. The lights will not be turned off, loud noises in the movie will be softer, and there’s no one to tell the kids to be quiet. Dr. Catherine Lord, Director of the new Institute for Brain Development at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill-Cornell Medical College, explained, “I think children and adults (with autism) really enjoy videos, enjoy stories and animation. They enjoy visual input and music, but the general atmosphere of a movie may be overwhelming. This program allows them to become accustomed with movie-going rather than feel lost in it.”

Young Man with Autism Performs as a Professional Musician

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We have covered music therapy as an option for kids with autism, but this young man has taken music a step further.

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We have covered music therapy as an option for kids with autism, but this young man has taken music a step further. Eric Look plays the piano and sings to audiences in Milwaukee. His family noticed his musical talents when he was younger; he could play just about any song he heard on the piano. Look had many sensory issues growing up, but recently explained, “I feel like a good musician. Music is what I love. I love to listen, I like to perform.” This young adult with autism writes and sings his own songs as well as those of his favorite, the late Jim Croce.

Sweetwater Spectrum is Housing Community for Adults with Autism

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Sweetwater Spectrum is more than just a group home for young adults and adults with autism, it is a community.

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Sweetwater Spectrum is more than just a group home for young adults and adults with autism, it is a community. The community in Sonoma, CA, will be home to 16 adults in four 3, 250 square foot homes. The founders have taken the best they’ve found in residential living from around the country and incorporated it into Sweetwater. The community is built to enhance, and not disturb sensory integration. There is a community kitchen, exercise studio, organic garden, art and music rooms, and life skills learning areas. The residents will work or attend the nearby community college or work in a sheltered day program.

Parents Join Forces with Community to Bring Sensory Integration Facilities to School

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Palisades Elementary School, in CA, is now home to an activity lab designed for kids with autism who may also have sensory issues.

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Palisades Elementary School, in CA, is now home to an activity lab designed for kids with autism who may also have sensory issues. Many of the students are in a structure autism classroom, but need a place to calm down when over stimulated. Principal Steve Scholl explained, “We look for any sensory contribution that will help that particular student calm down and really be ready to receive educational input.” Activities in the sensory lab, which looks like an occupational therapy center, include swinging, touching, sound, dim lighting, and/or jumping.

School District Highlights Sensory Room for Elementary Students with Autism

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Students with sensory processing disorder (SPD) and other special needs have their own place to go in Romeoville’s Autism Sensory Room.

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Students with sensory processing disorder (SPD) and other special needs have their own place to go in Romeoville’s Autism Sensory Room. The room, organized by OT Stephanie Raynor, is located at Kenneth L. Hermansen Elementary School. Raynor explains that as each child enters the room, either she or her assistant ask them how they are feeling. If non-verbal, the child can point to a picture on the wall to show if they are happy or sad. Other features of the sensory room are an obstacle course, trampoline, balance boards, therapy balls, and the opportunity to use yoga. Raynor explained, “As an Occupational Therapist working in a school district, some of the areas that I focus on are sensory integration, fine motor development and coordination, visual motor skills, and posture and balance.”

Top Ten Books Recommended for Sensory Processing Disorder

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Special Needs Book Reviews (SNBR) has compiled a list of their top ten choices for books on sensory processing disorder (SPD).

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While we have recommendations on our site, and we quote from a number of books on sensory processing disorder and its effect on kids with autism, Special Needs Book Reviews (SNBR) had compiled a list of their top ten choices. SNBR was formed to help inform parents of reading choices, purchasing choices, as well as communication with other families of kids with special needs. It’s no surprise that a number of SNBR’s choices are among ours as well. Among the top ten are: Raising a Sensory Smart Child; Tools for Tots; In-Sync Activity Cards; Answers to Questions Teachers Ask About Sensory Integration; and Learning in Motion 101. Links to the books can be found in the article.

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