speech therapy

definition of speech therapy: Type of therapy that focuses on improving vocal communication and speech.

Wisconsin School District Looking for Autism Teacher

Teaser: 

The Menomonie School Board, along with WQOW News 18 has been concerned about the rise of autism in their Wisconsin school district.

Body: 

The Menomonie School Board, along with WQOW News 18 has been concerned about the rise of autism in their Wisconsin school district. The school board recently approved hiring a teacher to work specifically with elementary school kids with autism. Christine McMasters, Director of Student Services, explained, “We've seen that we have enough students in our district to start thinking differently about how we would do some of the programming for students with autism." The teacher will focus on speech and language skills and sensory issues.

Speech and Language Therapy as Early Intervention for Autism

Teaser: 

This article suggests that a third of the children diagnosed with autism have communication issues.

Body: 

This article suggests that a third of the children diagnosed with autism have communication issues. These issues include not talking, unintelligible sounds, speaking in a sing-song tone, and repetition. The earlier speech and language therapy starts, the better the chances are that the child’s communication skills may improve. Speech and language therapy doesn’t just involve speaking, but also helping a child use facial expressions and body language. Other options used to increase speech and language skills include electronic talking devices, sign language, typing, picture boards (PECS), and facial massage.

Ghana Needs More Speech Therapists for Kids with Autism

Teaser: 

Dr. Ebenezer Badoe, the only pediatric speech therapist in Ghana, said there is a need for more speech therapists given the rise in autism.

Body: 

Dr. Ebenezer Badoe, the only pediatric speech therapist in Ghana, said there is a need for more speech therapists given the rise in autism. The physician at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital has taken part in a three-day autism workshop for teachers, doctors, nurses, therapists, and caregivers. Haven International and the special education unit of the Ghana Education Service sponsored the workshop. The workshop was focused not just on training, but on raising awareness so that teachers will stay in special education. Badoe, stated, “Some time ago, autism was not a word in Ghana until five years ago when I came back from the UK to work at Korle Bu. So far, I have seen 400 patients and about 90 per cent have been boys aged two years.” He also explained there has not been much research in autism in Ghana and there is a lack of data on autism.

Children with Autism Use Ballet to Improve Skills

Teaser: 

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center speech therapy students and Ballet Lubbock’s Erica Barhorst have joined forces to teach ballet to kids with autism.

Body: 

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center speech therapy graduate students, Katelyn Rich and Amanda Tinney, and Ballet Lubbock’s Erica Barhorst, have joined forces to teach ballet to kids with autism. Barhorst, a dancer and psychology major at Tech, used her skills in ballet and her interest in autism movement therapy, to teach 6-10 year olds ballet. Barhorst stated, “I had been doing research for my thesis about therapeutic benefits of dance and I came across autism – dance movement therapy in particular.” Sherry Sancibrian, speech and language professor, coordinated the effort with the other graduate students. She suggested that ndividual sports like dance, track, gymnastics, swimming and martial arts may be more helpful for children with autism because there is less social interaction required than in team sports, such as football or baseball.

Does Your Child Receive Occupational Therapy?

Teaser: 

When a person signs up for MyAutismTeam.com, one of the questions asked is, “What therapies, if any, worked best for your child?”

Body: 

When a person signs up for MyAutismTeam.com, one of the questions asked is, “What therapies, if any, worked best for your child?” MyAutismTeam.com, a social networking site for families of kids with autism, found that 39% of parents answered occupational therapy (OT). Speech therapy and applied behavior analysis (ABA) came in 2nd and 3rd. The site’s cofounder explained, “OT seems to start with the developmental needs of the individual and works from there.” The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), who wrote the article, exists to help OT therapists, educators and researchers, and students.

Lifesong Academy Uses ABA to Teach Kids with Autism

Teaser: 

Lifesong Academy therapeutic center was a natural outcome of the therapy skills Kim Derk used with her own children with autism.

Body: 

Lifesong Academy therapeutic center was a natural outcome of the therapy skills Kim Derk used with her own children with autism. Derk and her husband adopted six children from Hungary, several of whom were diagnosed on the autism spectrum. Evansville, IN, where they lived had few resources, so Kim became certified in applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapy in order to help her kids as well as others in the area. Her first therapy practice, Behavior Networks, provided the resources to open Lifesong Academy. Every child will be assessed and provided a therapy plan and one-on-one ABA therapy. Lifesong Academy works with the local schools, doctors, speech therapists, and occupational therapists to ensure each child gets the maximum therapy and academic benefits. Lifesong's goal is to give the child communication and social skills so that they can eventually place out of the Academy.

Therapies May be Continued Regardless of Child’s Place on the Autism Spectrum

Teaser: 

Mark Bertin, M.D. believes that a child, no matter where he or she falls on the autism spectrum, should continue to receive therapies.

Body: 

Mark Bertin, M.D., a developmental pediatrician, believes that a child, no matter where he or she falls on the autism spectrum, should continue to receive appropriate therapies. At the basis of his practice is educational planning for each child. Bertin believes the focus should be on six main areas: 1) continued behavioral therapy; 2) speech and language intervention; 3) repetitive social skills training; 4) occupational and physical therapies; 5) constant monitoring for any academic difficulties; and 6) possible increased support during unstructured time.

Play-Place for Autistic Children is Goal of Michigan Mom

Teaser: 

Play-Place for Autistic Children (PAC) is a recreational facility for kids with autism that Shell Jones hopes to have open in March 2013.

Body: 

Play-Place for Autistic Children (PAC) is a recreational facility for kids with autism that Shell Jones hopes to have open in March 2013. Jones worked with Dr. Rick Solomon, medical director of Ann Arbor Center for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, to take play therapy to a location that all kids could use and enjoy. Jones came up with the idea when she saw how much better her son did with therapy in social situations as opposed to one-on-one. Facilities at PAC will include: a playscape to help kids develop coordination and balance; a sensory balanced movie theatre; a memory-go-round for sensory integration; a chalkroom that will allow kids to write on the walls to promote visual and writing skills; and a kid-friendly hair salon. In addition to play therapy, PAC will offer occupational therapy, speech therapy, hyperbaric chamber therapy, and sensory integration therapy.

Center for Adults with Autism Includes Job Assistance

Teaser: 

Towson University, in Maryland, has increased the size of its Center for Adults with Autism.

Body: 

Towson University, in Maryland, has increased the size of its Center for Adults with Autism. In addition to wellness, speech and language, and occupational therapy, the center provides a place to learn job skills as well as a place to work. Adam Dankner, a young adult with autism, recently placed a healthy foods vending machine in the center. He was assisted in this new business venture, Adam’s Healthy Snacks, by Vend Natural, the Department of Disabilities, and Towson Center for Adults with Autism. Rhonda Greenhaw, director of the Center for Adults with Autism, explained, “Programming for adults with autism is a brand new area. Kids with autism grow up and there's nothing for them. We call it tunnels and cliffs. By the time they grow out of the services of high school, it's like falling off a cliff.”

|